What They Should Know – DBlog Week Day 5

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Prompt: Today let’s borrow a topic from a #dsma chat held last September.  The tweet asked “What is one thing you would tell someone that doesn’t have diabetes about living with diabetes?”.  Let’s do a little advocating and post what we wish people knew about diabetes.  Have more than one thing you wish people knew?  Go ahead and tell us everything.

Oh my… where do I begin? I guess the first I would like people to know is that there’s no such thing as a “bad” type of diabetes. They are just different. Whenever I meet someone new and they find out that I have to take injections, the first thing they usually assume is that it must be bad because their grandmother only has to take pills. Type 1 diabetics have to take insulin because our pancreas no longer makes it.

Then there is the belief that you must have eaten a ton of sweets as a kid. We did nothing wrong. Our immune system decided to attack our pancreas and the beta cells not longer function. It wasn’t caused by having a sweet tooth.

Oh… and the horror stories or magic cures that you heard about. We really don’t need to know that your aunt lost her leg, turned blind and is on dialysis three times a week. Dealing with diabetes is tough enough as it is without having to think of dreadful complications. We know the risks. We have heard them time and time again and as far as these ‘cures’ are concerned there is not enough research or proof to prove that any of them actually work. So let us stick with what we know will – insulin, healthy eating and exercise.

Last thing I would like to say would be to show any diabetic (Type 1, 2, LADA, etc) you’re support. No matter which type they have because we all go through challenges. It is a 24/7 365 days a year (366 on leap years) job. We have our ups and downs and many ‘normal’ tasks require premeditation on our part even when it seems like we do it so easily.

There is probably much more I could talk about but I will leave it at these for now. It’s my birthday today so I am off to go and celebrate. I hope everyone is having a great day and happy Dblog week!

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DBlog Week Day 2 – One Great Thing

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Today’s prompt: Living with diabetes (or caring for someone who lives with it) sure does take a lot of work, and it’s easy to be hard on ourselves if we aren’t “perfect”.  But today it’s time to give ourselves some much deserved credit.  Tell us about just one diabetes thing you (or your loved one) does spectacularly!  Fasting blood sugar checks, oral meds sorted and ready, something always on hand to treat a low, or anything that you do for diabetes.  Nothing is too big or too small to celebrate doing well!

I have to admit today’s post seem easy enough until I actually had to start writing it. I can think of tons of things I do wrong and I admit I tend to beat myself up when my blood sugars are off. When it came to thinking of something I do well my mind drew blanks. I could list a ton of things I am just average at. So I asked my mom; her answer was that I always drink tons of water.

At first I felt a little disappointed (Oh great… Is that it? – I drink water – how interesting) but then I realized how important it is to remain hydrated (especially if you’re high). I probably drink at least a gallon of water everyday – no exaggeration. There are times I don’t want to drink juice because of all the sugar, don’t always feel in the mood for diet soda (maybe because we only have the choice between Coke Zero, Diet Pepsi or Sprite Zero). Water is just pure and I always have a bottle of water by my side (especially since Barbados is so hot).

Maybe it is because in the hospital the first thing they put in you is a ton of IV fluids – which consist of mostly water. I used to always be told that I was dehydrated, sometimes going in to ICU for severe dehydration. Since I have been drinking more water, I find I am healthier and I have only been in hospital once for the last seven months (which is a big deal given my track record of going in almost every two to three months)

I guess it is not as spectacular as testing every two hours or being the carb-counting bolus queen (hopefully I will get there someday) but I am proud to say I drink more than my quota of 8 cups a day.

Round 1

Sorry that I’ve been away for so long. It’s hard to remain upbeat all of time especially when things don’t go as planned no matter how hard you try. Well, my blood sugar has really been riding a glu-coaster these past couple of weeks and I felt a little down.I felt like a complete failure.

I love the DOC because I began reading other blogs about people who are going through the same difficulties. Karen @ bitter~sweet diabetes wrote that “not trying is not an option”. I think that statement helped me through this time unlike anything else. Then I started googling motivational quotes and came across things like – “You haven’t failed until you stopped trying.”

I have a vivid imagination at times and pictured a boxing match between diabetes and myself. Now diabetes is big and tough while I’m skinny and weak, so diabetes has the advantage. Diabetes keeps knocking me down and I would get up, I’ll get knocked down again and get right back up. Now someone in the crowd (I picture this to be that mean little voice in your head that never believes in you) shouts “Just stay down!” and I shout back “No I will never give up!” My little story ends with Diabetes getting tired from always knocking me down and one random blow knocks him out. Yeaaa…. I am the winner.

This is how I have dealt with my bad days. What do you do when you are feeling frustrated?

Why I’m Crying

Heartbreak is a hard thing for anyone to deal with but when you are diabetic it can seem ten times worse. However, you can’t stop everything you are doing, eat a ton and sulk like you see in the movies. Your diabetes needs to be managed and you have to do it unless you want to add DKA to your pity party. Stress, in any shape or form, tends to raise my blood sugar levels higher than the Empire State building (or Central Bank for all my Bajans) and thats no joke, especially when you are trying to lower your a1c.

So today when the guy that I wasn’t sure I still liked, reminded me he was leaving and moving over 4000 miles away – I felt sad. I was heartbroken. Why is it that it is only when something is gone that you realize how much you really do miss it. It is like growing up before my diagnosis, I never liked anything sweet but after I would gaze longingly at my friends sno-cones and the snack table at the end of each school year filled with sodas, cakes and ice-cream. When I could have them before, they were never that appealing and the same is true with this guy… kind of.

So here I am with a tear-stained face wondering why am I crying. Is it because he is leaving…. (Seems like an awful lot of tears over a guy that I’m not sure I still like that much if you asked me)  or is it because my blood sugar is a bit high? (I tend to get overemotional with high blood sugars, either really angry or really sad.) Whatever the reason for my tears, I now have to focus on bringing down this high reading. An extra shot of insulin, a bottle of water and a comedy (laughter is always the best medicine at times like this). Hopefully, today won’t undo my whole week.

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